Wednesday, February 17, 2010

3WW CLXXVII

Image of a bouquet of roses, made from some foamed plastic, with glowing snippets of fibre optic cable sticking out. This image is titled 'Alien Bouquet hot from Victoria Park's Chinese New Year Fair (Hong Kong, 2010)'Dear Gentle Reader,

It is 3WW. Again.

Not so much love for my loose id postscript for last week's 3WW, but I take what I get, and I did like what I did receive. (What a suck, no?)

Anyway, thanks are due to Thom, as usual.

This week the 3WW word prompts are occur, ragged, and tidy.

As usual, I present three haiku/senryu, each with an American Sentence title.

So, let the games begin with occur, ragged, and tidy....

OH! You might note that I have gone with aural interpretations of the words, and visual sleight-of-hand, too, just for fun. (Mine.)

And, lastly, the Heroine of this site recommended that folks read the green explanations under two of the poems... ...and, without further adieu...


William shakes fist, spear; shivers the air with his tempestuous anger...

Oh cur! Oh ragged
Cur! Hang cur! Hang you whoreson...
[Tidy curse for foes!]


**The Tempest, Act 1, Scene 1
Antonio: "Hang cur! Hang, you whoreson, insolent noisemaker!"
William Shakespeare (1564-1616)






In soft, modern days and ages the old lives on, even if not here...

(D)ragged over thresholds--
out of tidy home to hell;
forced weddings occur.






To test his theory the new priest undressed her, removed her rags, and then...

Tidy ochre scraps
swept into neat piles by priest.
D-ragged... ...Mummy gone...


**Mummies, those fabulous Egyptians whose bodies were rendered less mortal, ultimately derive their name from bitumen, a heavy petroleum product, once worked into devotional art by the Medes, early Persians, and by others.

It was believed, from the colour of the preserved corpses, that bitumen, mum in Persian, thence mumia in Latin, thence Mummy in English, had been used in the mummification process.

The modern priestly caste, sometimes known as scientists, de-ragged, or removed the wrappings on the corpses--the Mummies--to check, and found no trace of bitumen in the Mummies' corpses.... so, linguistically, the Mummy was a Mummy no more (no bitumen).



Tschuess,
Chris


PS. As an aside the baroque musical style 'Ciaccona', possibly more familiar to most through its French name, chaconne, always reminds me of modern dance music; it has a driving bass line with a series of short harmonic variations which dance around that beat. I enjoy dance music (I enjoy dancing) and tend not to be too epochcentric... Hopefully some of you will enjoy this selection.

(Admittedly, the beat per minute rate of this Ciaccona is slower than most modern dance and electronic music, but most ravers and dubsteppers are wearing clothing easily weighed in micrograms, not the kilograms of baroque outfits, not to mention those Lady GaGa-esque baroque wigs...)


Tschuess,
Chris



20 comments:

Yousei Hime said...

I came for a poem and stayed for a feast. Haiku and baroque music! Well met stranger. Let us amend our status and share a bit of poetry and art. Thank you for all you shared here.

Dee Martin said...

I so enjoyed you playing with the bard - loved (D)ragged and I had never heard mummys explained. Great stuff - it never would have oh cur(ed) to me to play with the prompts that way. Thanks for the visit and the kind words.

anthonynorth said...

Great words and information too. You've excelled this week.

Andy Sewina said...

Hi Chris, brilliant as ever, have you tried playing the Syllable Sestina yet? There are a couple of examples on my blog, if you scroll down the home page. I think you'd be good at it.

ThomG said...

You present a thinking man's view on poetry, which I find quite thought-provoking. I really like when you participate, since there's a meatiness to your posts. I like them a lot.

Teresa said...

The music just makes this post sublime. I LOVE baroque music.

The haikus were fun. The second, in particular, struck a chord.

But I always thought the phrase was "without further ado" or are you punning there, too? "without further ado about nothing" would have been a great segue to your poem about the Bard. But I guess "Adieu, adieu, parting is such sweet sorrow" works, too.


Adieu, cher ami. I'm so glad you're back and blogging!

mark said...

I think you outdid yourself this go 'round...

Angel said...

I always learn something from your work.

Daily Panic said...

i always like the compact use of words you display. it always makes me stop and think of how the words are used in their simplicity and still be very complex. Ejoyed this a lot.

Stan Ski said...

Great use of the prompt words - well written, informative.

Cloudia said...

Aloha, baroque Friend!


Comfort Spiral

Thomma Lyn said...

Your post is a delight -- poetry and music, two of my favorite things! Your poetry is word music, and accompanied by the lovely baroque music... well, in a word, Bliss. :)

Crystal Phares said...

Great use of the words this week, Chris. Thanks for sharing!

Tim Remp said...

I love Shakespeare. ‘The Tempest’ was a special favorite along with ‘Macbeth’. Wonderful work.

-Tim

Mine is here: http://timremp.blogspot.com/

Tumblewords: said...

You use the words in the deepest way, layered and served up well. Always interesting to see which music accompanies these thoughts and how you were thinking when you penned. Excellent post!

Ann (bunnygirl) said...

I love the way you draw inspiration from all over. Truly 360. Fun and novel use of the prompts, too!

peggy said...

Wow. Sometimes you just blow me away.

You are very clever with the words, and interesting. Thanks for the information about Mummy's.

Jay Thurston said...

Very informative on the origin of the mummy. Enjoyed the haikus as well!

murat11 said...

Brother: Though perhaps not quantity love for "loose ids," you definitely got quality in the amour. With this batch, I'm with Teresa's vote for #2.

You can't beat WS for bodacious insult. Friends gave me a mug for Christmas, festooned with insults from the plays.

Thou elvish-mark'd abortive, rooting hog is a particular favorite. Where else, but Richard III.

Party on, brother.

Travis Erwin said...

Nice job Chris.